The number of Disability Confident employers has risen by 1,100% in the last five years, according to new figures published by the global hiring platform Indeed.

However, people with disabilities feel there is still work to be done, with around two thirds (68%) saying that employers should be doing more to support disabled people into employment.

Two in five disabled workers said there are good job opportunities available for them

The figures come one year after the government announced its National Disability Strategy, and suggest that employers are proactively addressing barriers faced by disabled people throughout the hiring process.

But only two in five (40%) disabled workers believe there are good job opportunities available for them and 58% agree that finding a job is harder for them than others.

Furthermore, just half of respondents say they feel confident they can reach their full potential at work, with around a third citing location (34%) and flexibility of hours (39%) as key elements that could make a job better for someone with a disability.

A gap between how employers view themselves and the experience of disabled employees

So far, more than 19,000 employers have signed up to the Disability Confident Scheme launched by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), with around half of scheme members reporting they had recruited at least one person with a disability, long-term health or mental health condition as a result.

The scheme aims to give employers the techniques, skills and confidence they need to recruit, retain and develop people with disabilities and long-term health conditions.

However, Bill Richards UK Managing Director at the global hiring platform Indeed says there is clearly a gap between how employers view themselves and the experience of disabled employees.

“It’s more important than ever that employers ensure people with disabilities feel happy and secure within their work”

Mr Richards said: “A year on from the launch of the National Disability Strategy, it’s clear we’re moving in the right direction to improve the everyday lives of all disabled people.

“Our analysis shows a huge increase in the number of employers promoting themselves as Disability Confident in job ads, highlighting a commitment to improving access to the workplace for people with disabilities and long-term health conditions.

“While progress has been made, we know that there is still a gap between the way employers view themselves as ready to recruit, retain and develop people with disabilities and the reality for employees themselves.

“Job security was cited by 65% of respondents with disabilities as the gold standard companies should aim for and against the backdrop of soaring inflation and the rising cost of living, it’s more important than ever that employers ensure people with disabilities feel happy and secure within their work, beyond simply outlining commitments at the recruitment stage.”