Disability charity United Response has launched an easy read version of its website, with video translation on each page, to ensure it is accessible to as many people with learning disabilities as possible (23rd August 2012).

Produced in collaboration with UR Consultants, a group of people with learning disabilities who are experts in easy read translation, the website aims to provide an accessible route through which all people with learning disabilities can find out about the charity’s work and the services it provides.

The new version of the website is part of United Response’s wider commitment to accessibility and equality for people with learning disabilities. It is one of a growing number of easy read resources and translations produced by the charity.

Diane Lightfoot, United Response’s director of communications and fundraising, said: “As a charity which both campaigns with people with learning disabilities and provides support, it’s vital that people are able to access information about our work in a way which they find easy to understand.

“The introduction of personal budgets means that people with learning disabilities now have greater choice that ever before over the support they receive – and that’s great news. But people can only make a truly informed decision about their support, if information is available in a format which is relevant to their needs.”

Pete Le Grys, from Photosymbols, a library of pictures designed for making easy read information, welcomed the charity’s move: “It’s great to see an organisation like United Response putting so much work into the important things; easy read information about voting and politics and managing your money, but also making a version of their website available in easy read too. It shows their commitment to making real change and working with the important stuff.”

The easy read version of United Response’s website can be accessed at http://www.unitedresponse.org.uk/easy-read-main-menu/. Each page is presented using words and pictures, with video translation provided by David, a man with learning disabilities who works for United Response.